Parenting Blog

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Expert Amanda Jenner's Top Potty Training Tips!

Posted by Amanda Jenner

 

1. Choose your timing wisely. It is best not to start potty training if there has been a change in circumstance for example your toddler is unwell, there is a new baby in the family, you have just moved into a new home, your toddler has started a new childcare setting, there are any family problems in the household. Starting too early can lead to failure in potty training so make sure your little one is showing all the signs they are ready before you start and don’t be influenced by others.


2. It is also important to let everyone know. Tell your nursery, child carers or anyone else who looks after your child that you have started toilet training. Let them know what techniques you are using, for example a reward chart or sticker system, as this helps to keep everything consistent and avoid training set-backs. Don't interrupt stop toilet training if they are spending a night away at grandparents or a friend's house as they will become easily confused.

 

3. Start any time of the year. There is no season for potty training. This can be done at any time of the year. If your little one is showing signs of readiness you must go with this and not wait for the summer to arrive. If you delay training until the summer you may find your little one will show no interest whatsoever, which will make potty training a lot more difficult for you and your little one.

 

4. Extra help. You may also want to buy a picture book or video all about potty training that you can look over with your tot. That way, you’ll both be prepared for the training ahead.

 

5. Get the clothes right. You don’t want to spend ages changing your toddler’s clothes, so make sure what he or she is wearing is easy to remove. You can try using training pants. Some toddlers like them, while others just think of them as a different type of nappy (which is confusing). Most toddlers are encouraged by having real underwear instead: it makes them feel grown up.

 

6. Get the right equipment. Getting the right equipment for potty training is always a good start. A child-sized potty, a carry potty or a special seat to attach to your regular toilet is a must. Whichever you choose, make sure your child can sit comfortably.

 

7. Let them choose their own potty/toilet trainer seat. Getting your little one involved is essential after all it is them who are going to be using it. It is always helpful to have both a potty and a trainer seat to hand. Try choosing a seat that matches your child’s potty in colour or design as this keeps training consistent and will help make the transition to the toilet smoother

 

8. Be prepared in and out the home. If you live in a two-storey house, keep a potty upstairs and one downstairs. Teach your toddler from day one that this is normal inside and outside the home. Take your potty and/or training seat with you wherever you go. Remind them that they have it with them as this will help them feel secure and confident. This will also help reduce accidents as often there is little warning when they need to go.

 

9. Do give lots of encouragement. Praise and play base learning has been proven to be effective approach for potty training little ones. Use reward charts, stickers, a reward box to fill up with special treats that they like - and a good toilet training story book to keep up the momentum.

 

10. Don't scold or raise your voice. Accidents will happen, remember to keep calm, as scolding your child will result in the fear of toilet training. This will cause a set-back.

 

11. Don't compare your child. Every child develops at a different rate, and that goes for eating, walking, talking and all the other milestones - so try not to compare your child's potty training to anyone else's. You will always get those parents who tell you their toddler was trained before the age of 1. Trust the signs your child is showing, and go with it.

 

12. Rewarding. Every toddler loves to feel special and to please mummy and daddy and especially when it comes to potty training. Using rewards is a great way to encourage your toddler to sit on the potty or the toilet, this can be reward chart and stickers or even a magical star box. It is important to reward even if they try and do not perform, sometimes it can be difficult to get them sitting on the potty or the toilet and this needs a little extra encouragement. Make sure you reward them immediately so they get the instant gratification.

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1. Choose your timing wisely. It is best not to start potty training if there has been a change in circumstance for example your toddler is unwell, there is a new baby in the family, you have just moved into a new home, your toddler has started a new childcare setting, there are any family problems in the household. Starting too early can lead to failure in potty training so make sure your little one is showing all the signs they are ready before you start and don’t be influenced by others.


2. It is also important to let everyone know. Tell your nursery, child carers or anyone else who looks after your child that you have started toilet training. Let them know what techniques you are using, for example a reward chart or sticker system, as this helps to keep everything consistent and avoid training set-backs. Don't interrupt stop toilet training if they are spending a night away at grandparents or a friend's house as they will become easily confused.

 

3. Start any time of the year. There is no season for potty training. This can be done at any time of the year. If your little one is showing signs of readiness you must go with this and not wait for the summer to arrive. If you delay training until the summer you may find your little one will show no interest whatsoever, which will make potty training a lot more difficult for you and your little one.

 

4. Extra help. You may also want to buy a picture book or video all about potty training that you can look over with your tot. That way, you’ll both be prepared for the training ahead.

 

5. Get the clothes right. You don’t want to spend ages changing your toddler’s clothes, so make sure what he or she is wearing is easy to remove. You can try using training pants. Some toddlers like them, while others just think of them as a different type of nappy (which is confusing). Most toddlers are encouraged by having real underwear instead: it makes them feel grown up.

 

6. Get the right equipment. Getting the right equipment for potty training is always a good start. A child-sized potty, a carry potty or a special seat to attach to your regular toilet is a must. Whichever you choose, make sure your child can sit comfortably.

 

7. Let them choose their own potty/toilet trainer seat. Getting your little one involved is essential after all it is them who are going to be using it. It is always helpful to have both a potty and a trainer seat to hand. Try choosing a seat that matches your child’s potty in colour or design as this keeps training consistent and will help make the transition to the toilet smoother

 

8. Be prepared in and out the home. If you live in a two-storey house, keep a potty upstairs and one downstairs. Teach your toddler from day one that this is normal inside and outside the home. Take your potty and/or training seat with you wherever you go. Remind them that they have it with them as this will help them feel secure and confident. This will also help reduce accidents as often there is little warning when they need to go.

 

9. Do give lots of encouragement. Praise and play base learning has been proven to be effective approach for potty training little ones. Use reward charts, stickers, a reward box to fill up with special treats that they like - and a good toilet training story book to keep up the momentum.

 

10. Don't scold or raise your voice. Accidents will happen, remember to keep calm, as scolding your child will result in the fear of toilet training. This will cause a set-back.

 

11. Don't compare your child. Every child develops at a different rate, and that goes for eating, walking, talking and all the other milestones - so try not to compare your child's potty training to anyone else's. You will always get those parents who tell you their toddler was trained before the age of 1. Trust the signs your child is showing, and go with it.

 

12. Rewarding. Every toddler loves to feel special and to please mummy and daddy and especially when it comes to potty training. Using rewards is a great way to encourage your toddler to sit on the potty or the toilet, this can be reward chart and stickers or even a magical star box. It is important to reward even if they try and do not perform, sometimes it can be difficult to get them sitting on the potty or the toilet and this needs a little extra encouragement. Make sure you reward them immediately so they get the instant gratification.

Read more

Let’s get ready for school!

Posted by Amanda Jenner

September will be here before we know it and with the start of a new term. If you’re little one is due to start this year it can seem like a huge change for both them and you! To help you manage the start of this massive milestone here are my top tips on how to prepare your child for their big day. 

 

Start the toilet training process 

Make sure your child can go to the toilet independently before they start school. If they are not then start the process at least 3 months before school starts. Is your child showing the signs of readiness? This includes stopping in their tracks when they do a wee or a poo, having longer dry spells in their nappies and being able to communicate and follow basic instruction. Get yourself prepared first by reading a toilet training book and get everything in you will need including big girl/boy pants, potty or toilet seat and some handwash. Communicate your routine with every adult that comes into contact with your child so they can support what you are doing (nursery, grandparents etc.). 

 

Let’s talk hygiene 

Hygiene is so important when your child starts school, you can help them to understand the importance by encouraging them at an early age to wash their hands after the toilet and before eating food. So many germs are rife in schools, I cannot stress how important this is. 

When showing your little one how to wash their hands take your time to show them how to do this correctly (i.e in between fingers) and dry their hands fully. 

Also make sure that your child can wipe themselves properly and flush the toilet themselves. 

 

Let’s get dressed 

Teach your child to be independent by dressing and undressing themselves, it’s a great idea to practise putting their uniform on with them before the big day! Make sure they are confident with fastening and unfastening buttons, zips and Velcro and congratulate them when they put on their socks and shoes on the right feet. 

This is all very important as they need to do this independently when they start school and it can be very distressing for them if they are struggling to do this themselves. 

 

Snacks/Lunch boxes 

Having your little one involved in preparing their lunch boxes will make them feel very grown up and they will feel much more encouraged to eat them as they have had a part to play in making them. 

I think a varied, healthy and balanced lunch box is perfect, you want a nutritious lunch that will fuel them for the afternoon ahead. Some healthy ideas include fruit, vegetable crudities, yoghurt and pasta. 

 

 

Let’s talk school 

Most children would have been for a taster session at their school but it’s really important to keep reminding them about their big day. Find out their teachers name and mention this in conversation a few weeks ahead of time. Show your little one the journey to school to familiarise them and start activities at home such as reading books about school and drawing the school and their teacher. These all work brilliantly to ease the process and help make the build-up and the day itself, a less daunting experience. 

 

Starting school and toilet training 

  • Remember that accidents can happen, especially when children are taking in a brand new environment. Just make sure they know it’s OK to ask the teacher for help. 
  • Ensure your child knows where the toilet is at school and that it is ok to ask the teacher to go to the toilet when they need to. 
  • For the first few weeks you could pack some spare clothes in your little ones bag so that if accidents happen they feel prepared. 
  • If you are worried about this then you must speak to the teacher and together you can come up with a plan. 
  • Make sure your little on has enough fluids throughout the school day and they know where to get water from. 

 

When it comes to the weekend, enjoy that precious time with your little one and congratulate them for enjoying their first week at school! 

 

Amanda x
Read more

September will be here before we know it and with the start of a new term. If you’re little one is due to start this year it can seem like a huge change for both them and you! To help you manage the start of this massive milestone here are my top tips on how to prepare your child for their big day. 

 

Start the toilet training process 

Make sure your child can go to the toilet independently before they start school. If they are not then start the process at least 3 months before school starts. Is your child showing the signs of readiness? This includes stopping in their tracks when they do a wee or a poo, having longer dry spells in their nappies and being able to communicate and follow basic instruction. Get yourself prepared first by reading a toilet training book and get everything in you will need including big girl/boy pants, potty or toilet seat and some handwash. Communicate your routine with every adult that comes into contact with your child so they can support what you are doing (nursery, grandparents etc.). 

 

Let’s talk hygiene 

Hygiene is so important when your child starts school, you can help them to understand the importance by encouraging them at an early age to wash their hands after the toilet and before eating food. So many germs are rife in schools, I cannot stress how important this is. 

When showing your little one how to wash their hands take your time to show them how to do this correctly (i.e in between fingers) and dry their hands fully. 

Also make sure that your child can wipe themselves properly and flush the toilet themselves. 

 

Let’s get dressed 

Teach your child to be independent by dressing and undressing themselves, it’s a great idea to practise putting their uniform on with them before the big day! Make sure they are confident with fastening and unfastening buttons, zips and Velcro and congratulate them when they put on their socks and shoes on the right feet. 

This is all very important as they need to do this independently when they start school and it can be very distressing for them if they are struggling to do this themselves. 

 

Snacks/Lunch boxes 

Having your little one involved in preparing their lunch boxes will make them feel very grown up and they will feel much more encouraged to eat them as they have had a part to play in making them. 

I think a varied, healthy and balanced lunch box is perfect, you want a nutritious lunch that will fuel them for the afternoon ahead. Some healthy ideas include fruit, vegetable crudities, yoghurt and pasta. 

 

 

Let’s talk school 

Most children would have been for a taster session at their school but it’s really important to keep reminding them about their big day. Find out their teachers name and mention this in conversation a few weeks ahead of time. Show your little one the journey to school to familiarise them and start activities at home such as reading books about school and drawing the school and their teacher. These all work brilliantly to ease the process and help make the build-up and the day itself, a less daunting experience. 

 

Starting school and toilet training 

  • Remember that accidents can happen, especially when children are taking in a brand new environment. Just make sure they know it’s OK to ask the teacher for help. 
  • Ensure your child knows where the toilet is at school and that it is ok to ask the teacher to go to the toilet when they need to. 
  • For the first few weeks you could pack some spare clothes in your little ones bag so that if accidents happen they feel prepared. 
  • If you are worried about this then you must speak to the teacher and together you can come up with a plan. 
  • Make sure your little on has enough fluids throughout the school day and they know where to get water from. 

 

When it comes to the weekend, enjoy that precious time with your little one and congratulate them for enjoying their first week at school! 

 

Amanda x
Read more

Potty Training Boys Vs Potty Training Girls

Posted by Amanda Jenner

There is no major difference when potty training boys versus potty training girls.

Boys are harder to potty train than girls

This is a myth that I often hear, but it’s definitely just a myth!

I have potty trained a great many boys and girls and have experienced equally successful results between both. The only different is some parents like boys to potty train standing which can cause a slight delay because this does take practice.

 I always potty train boys to sit while they are weeing as, initially, they do not have much control when standing and it can make them very distressed when they wee everywhere. Potty training boys by sitting tends to empty their bladder a lot more when sitting. Asking a boy to stand while weeing is just another thing for them to think about during their early stages of potty training as they have to hold their penis and aim in the correct place. You will find that potty training boys standing will come in time as they get a little bit older, though maybe not for some. It is also good for boys to sit as they must do this when they poo, so it helps with consistency during potty training.

 

Potty training girls is important to show how to wipe after they have been for a wee from front to back to avoid infections. You can assist at the beginning guiding her hand, but gradually let her do this independently, but try to avoid her over wiping as this may cause her to be sore down below. Be warned little girls tend to love using lots of toilets roll for this.

For boys you can use a tissue to dab the end of their penis or teach them to shake when they start to stand to do a wee.

Obviously, all little ones learn at a different paces and gender isn’t a factor its just when they are ready.

Amanda x

 

Read more

There is no major difference when potty training boys versus potty training girls.

Boys are harder to potty train than girls

This is a myth that I often hear, but it’s definitely just a myth!

I have potty trained a great many boys and girls and have experienced equally successful results between both. The only different is some parents like boys to potty train standing which can cause a slight delay because this does take practice.

 I always potty train boys to sit while they are weeing as, initially, they do not have much control when standing and it can make them very distressed when they wee everywhere. Potty training boys by sitting tends to empty their bladder a lot more when sitting. Asking a boy to stand while weeing is just another thing for them to think about during their early stages of potty training as they have to hold their penis and aim in the correct place. You will find that potty training boys standing will come in time as they get a little bit older, though maybe not for some. It is also good for boys to sit as they must do this when they poo, so it helps with consistency during potty training.

 

Potty training girls is important to show how to wipe after they have been for a wee from front to back to avoid infections. You can assist at the beginning guiding her hand, but gradually let her do this independently, but try to avoid her over wiping as this may cause her to be sore down below. Be warned little girls tend to love using lots of toilets roll for this.

For boys you can use a tissue to dab the end of their penis or teach them to shake when they start to stand to do a wee.

Obviously, all little ones learn at a different paces and gender isn’t a factor its just when they are ready.

Amanda x

 

Read more

Travelling on Holiday with Toddlers

Posted by Amanda Jenner

It’s that time of year where we look to head off on our family holiday but sometimes the idea of heading abroad with a toddler can make even the calmest of parents a bag of nerves. 
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It’s that time of year where we look to head off on our family holiday but sometimes the idea of heading abroad with a toddler can make even the calmest of parents a bag of nerves. 
Read more

Ditch the nappies & start potty training!

Posted by Amanda Jenner

After lots of research by UK’s Toilet Training Expert Amanda Jenner, she found that the average toddler by 3.5 years old will have used 5,500 nappies, which costs £1400 or £33.40 per month. Every day we throw away 8 million nappies a day. That’s a massive 3 Billion nappies thrown into the UK landfills every year!

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After lots of research by UK’s Toilet Training Expert Amanda Jenner, she found that the average toddler by 3.5 years old will have used 5,500 nappies, which costs £1400 or £33.40 per month. Every day we throw away 8 million nappies a day. That’s a massive 3 Billion nappies thrown into the UK landfills every year!

Read more